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Elimination of Chagas Disease by Dr. C. J. Schofield, KFWH Advisor

Elimination of Chagas Disease by Dr. C. J. Schofield, KFWH Advisor

  Over 80% of Chagas infections in Latin America are passed on by domestic insect vectors. Dr. Chris Schofield outlines how eliminating these on a very large scale would stop disease transmission, as well as the risk of insect vectors spreading elsewhere in the world. Early disease detection and treatment combined with continued surveillance for insect re-infestation are also essential to meet the challenge of eliminating Chagas disease as a public health problem. Be an expert!  Click here for full article. Dr. Christopher Schofield is Coordinator of ECLAT at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. He is a world renowned researcher of  Chagas Disease. We are privileged to have Dr. Schofield as a member of our Kids for World Health Advisory Board. speaking at our EXPO...

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KFWH Enters South America for the Treatment of Chagas Disease!

KFWH Enters South America for the Treatment of Chagas Disease!

Click to view CDC PDF (printable images) Chagas in Bolivia (Hit Cancel to stop printing) The above  slide presentation is  a series of photos taken by workers from CDC in Camiri, Bolivia where KFWH is working on the treatment of Chagas.  Notice the cracks in the mud houses where the beetle vector may enter at night. Click off the “print” page, and the beginning of the slide show will be appear. Below the photo of the map, you will find arrows to lead you through the pages. In 2012, the Kids for World Health Policy Board voted to expand its outreach to Bolivia after a meeting with the Neglected Diseases Department of the Center for Disease Control ( CDC) in Atlanta, GA. Coordinating with doctoral program researchers, Dr. Eva Clark, Lauren Pring and Dr. Gerson Galdos of The Johns Hopkins School of Public Health based in Santa Cruz, a program to provide introducers  and leads for pacemakers was created and implemented. At late stages,  Chagas Disease damages the intestinal...

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Celebration of Clinic #6 in Bodo, Chad!

Celebration of Clinic #6 in Bodo, Chad!

In October, 2012, Kids for World Health opened its 6th Treatment Center. This newest clinic was built in Bodo, Chad in Africa. Guided by our Advisory Team Member,Dr. Pere` Simarro of WHO, the Student Policy Board voted to construct this much needed clinic for the treatment of Sleeping Sickness. The clinic will service potentially 150,000 villagers at various times. The KFWH Pediatric Clinic #6  was honored in tribute to the work of  Dr. Pere...

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Celebrating the Opening of KFWH Pediatric Clinic #4 in Lwala,Uganda

Celebrating the Opening of KFWH Pediatric Clinic #4 in Lwala,Uganda

It’s open! The new mattresses and  beds are in place and the mosquito nets are hung!  Our shipment has arrived, and our clinic is open!  The staff at Lwala Hospital  are ready to receive children from the villages of Lwala, and the 150,000 villagers in the surrounding areas where people suffer from malaria and sleeping sickness (trypanosomiasis). The clinic built by funds raised by students in KFWH  is in tribute to Dr. Jean Jannin, Coordinator/Director of Neglected Tropical Diseases at the World Health Organization. Dr. Jean Jannin is our founding mentor and currently serves on our Advisory Board and KFWH Advisory Team. He and his department have been highly responsible for the possible elimination of sleeping sickness in many highly effected areas of Africa. Dr. Jannin Photo Gallery, Lwala Hospital, KFWH...

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Kids for World Health Presents: “My Trip to Uganda: A Journey to the Human Spirit” – with photographic journal

Kids for World Health Presents: “My Trip to Uganda: A Journey to the Human Spirit” – with photographic journal

Africa…As a child, I dreamed of the visual map of a distinctively shaped continent far far away; images of jungle-like landscapes, tall grass, roaming hungry lions, rambunctious chimpanzees, and a doctor named Albert Schweitzer. I remember asking the questions, as assuredly most of us do, as to why we are born to different parts of the world, each of us with a life to live…often finding ourselves in very different centers of what appears to be inequitable opportunity. And underlying that cultural stamp, I often asked myself, “What is it that we do share…and how visible are our human spirits within the recognition of what we hold in common as residents of our life-embraced planet? As our generation grew, the world suddenly became smaller, and the concept of Pangaea continents seemed to become a virtual reality, clearly making possibilities of understanding more feasible and necessary across our globe. As communication became more accessible and technology allowed for direct visitations, the continents seemed to shift once again, giving real opportunities...

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